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Closing a Chapter in His ‘Never-Ending Mission’

The Washington Post published an article on October 24, 2016, about Knight Commission chairman William ‘Brit’ Kirwan, who is stepping down from the leadership post at the end of 2016. LINK HERE to read “Closing a chapter in his ‘never-ending mission’”

Knight Commission Urges NCAA to Pass Proposal to Reward Schools for Meeting Academic Expectations

[Sessions and video with experts on college sports finances; and state and future of NCAA basketball]

On the eve of a critical vote by the NCAA, the Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics today urged passage of a new policy that would, for the first time, provide financial awards to schools that meet academic expectations for sports teams and athletes. During its fall meeting at the Newseum, the Commission also encouraged the NCAA to adopt policies under consideration that would reduce athletic time demands on college athletes.

Kirwan Retiring as Chair of Knight Commission

Knight Foundation announces changes in leadership and membership Knight Foundation President and CEO Alberto Ibargüen today announced leadership and membership changes to the Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics, including the retirement of its chairman, Dr. William E. “Brit” Kirwan. Kirwan’s final meeting will be at the Commission’s session today at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.

Knight Commission Statement on Supreme Court Declining to Take Up O’Bannon Case

Now that the case is resolved, Commission says it’s time for NCAA to step up reform to prioritize college athletes’ education, protect their health and safety The Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics issued the following statement in response to the U.S. Supreme Court declining to review the appeals court ruling in O’Bannon v. NCAA. The

Knight Commission Studies Interest in Alternative Division I Competition Models

Knight Commission Studies Interest in Alternative Division I Competition Models A Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics study reveals interest among university presidents, athletics administrators, faculty and head coaches in exploring alternative models for Division I competition and administration of different sports that may reduce missed class time and travel costs. The study was conducted to

Knight Commission Statements on NCAA Values-Based Revenue Distribution Working Group Recommendations

The Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics has issued the following statements in response to the NCAA Values-Based Revenue Distribution Working Group recommendations, which have been the subject of a recent media report: September 30, 2016 Knight Commission Chair William E. “Brit” Kirwan, chancellor emeritus, University System of Maryland The Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics enthusiastically

Knight Commission to Meet on Oct. 24 at Newseum

Media Inquiries: Fred Frommer fred.frommer@deweysquare.com, 202.772.0459 Group will tackle important issues in quickly changing field of college sports Who: The Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics, chaired by William E. “Brit” Kirwan, chancellor emeritus, University System of Maryland and Co-Vice Chairs Carol Cartwright, president emeritus, Kent State University and Arne Duncan, former U.S. Secretary of Education,

Knight Commission Calls for NCAA to Transform its Guidelines for March Madness Revenues to Better Support College Athletes and Protect Financial Integrity

[Sessions and video with experts on NCAA revenue distribution; health and safety issues; amateurism; and athletic time demands]

The Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics met today at the National Press Club and called for the NCAA to establish a new guiding principle for the use of NCAA revenues distributed to institutions from the March Madness tournament. The Commission recommended that 100 percent of NCAA revenues received by institutions should be restricted to supporting athletes’ education and providing them with appropriate health and safety benefits and protections. Under current guidelines, just 25 percent of NCAA revenues received by institutions are restricted to support athletes’ education and provide other benefits.