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Sports Illustrated: The SEC, NCAA and a Fight to Change College Sports

SI’s Ross Dellenger cites the Knight Commission’s October 2020 survey of college administrators and subsequent recommendations. Read the full article here. Last October, the Knight Commission released a sweeping survey in which it polled college administrators on two potential future NCAA models: (1) create a fourth division made up only of the 65 Power 5 teams; (2)

Politico: NCAA lifts athlete endorsement rules as states scramble to court players

Knight Commission CEO Amy P. Perko speaks with Politico’s Juan Perez Jr. highlighting the need for action from college sports leaders. Read the article here. “Schools are doing what they’ve always done: trying to figure out how to get a competitive edge,” said Amy Perko, CEO of the Knight Commission college sports reform organization. “Now

NPR: The Supreme Court Sides With NCAA Athletes In A Narrow Ruling

NPR’s Nina Totenberg spoke with Knight Commission CEO Amy Privette Perko and Co-Chair Len Elmore about the Supreme Court’s unanimous ruling in favor of college athletes in the NCAA v. Alston case. Read and listen here. Elmore, co-chair of the independent Knight Commission, would like to see the rules for collegiate athletics more broadly changed,

Wall Street Journal: After Decades of Control, the NCAA Finds Itself ‘On Its Heels’

The Wall Street Journal spoke with Knight Commission Co-Chair Len Elmore on the Supreme Court’s unanimous ruling in favor of college athletes in the NCAA v. Alston case: “The NCAA is on its heels right now,” said Len Elmore, co-chair of the Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics, an advocacy group that aims to reform inequities in college

Opinion: Time for a Racial Reckoning in College Sports Leadership

Co-vice chairs of our racial equity task force, Shanteona Keys and Jacques McClendon, published an op-ed in The Athletic on why it is so critical for institutions to enact the Commission’s 4 recommendations to achieve racial equity. You can read our whole report here. An excerpt from the article: “We believe that one of the

Bloomberg Quicktake: Why These Money-Making Athletes Are Paid Nothing

Bloomberg’s Business of Sports released a 20-minute brief on the Name, Image, and Likeness issues facing college sports. This explainer features Knight Commission CEO Amy Privette Perko, Consultant Gabe Feldman, and Commission member Kendall Spencer. View on Bloomberg here.

Financial Times: Pandemic Threatens Lucrative US College Football Tradition

In this important takeout on the coronavirus pandemic’s impact on college football revenue, the international newspaper The Financial Times cited the work of our College Athletics Financial Information (CAFI) Database:

The contract between the college football playoff system and its broadcaster, ESPN, is worth $7.3bn over 12 years, according to the Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics. Schools with large fan bases such as Notre Dame automatically earn $3.2m for qualifying for a playoff spot, while the baseline payout for other playoff-eligible schools is $300,000.

View the full article at FT.com (Subscription required)

Sports Business Journal: Knight Commission’s Len Elmore Defends Case for FBS Separation

The leading sports industry trade publication highlighted our new co-chair’s comments explaining why it’s so important for the NCAA to incorporate our Division I reform ideas, including a major change in revenue distribution:

Knight Commission co-Chair Len Elmore defended the group’s recent proposal to create an entity separate from the NCAA to govern FBS football, calling the current model “financially dysfunctional.” Elmore’s argument came on Thursday at the Learfield IMG College Intercollegiate Athletics Forum after many college leaders — including NCAA President Mark Emmert and SEC Commissioner Greg Sankey — criticized the commission’s idea throughout the week.

Elmore said the FBS “lacks accountability” to the rest of the NCAA because of the outsize power of major college football, and because it is beholden to outside stakeholders, such as the CFP, in ways the rest of the NCAA is not. “The NCAA revenue distribution formula should only count for sports that the NCAA operates in postseason and controls the revenues,” Elmore said. “And in FBS, they don’t do that.” He added that over $60M “could be saved” by separating the [sport of football in the] FBS.

View the full article at SportsBusinessDaily.com (Subscription required)